SPEED-THE-PLOW

Act Productions, Criterion Productions plc Karl Sydow

in association with The Ambassador Theatre Group

Originally produced by The Lincoln Center Theatre, New York

SPEED-THE-PLOW

By David Mamet

There are few things that look as glamorous as the American film industry.   Glitz, glamour, girls: it is little wonder that every year thousands of Americans descend on southern California in search of the good life.  

The real Hollywood is, however, a very different proposition to the public face of the film industry that is to be seen on show at the Oscars and similar award ceremonies.   The real Hollywood is a tough place.  

The citizens of the suburb aren't movie stars, they're producers and execs: the bullies and shysters responsible for financing films.    These men and women aren't interested in art; they're interested in percentage points and profits.  

When the first producers decided to set up shop in Hollywood in 1912, they did so in order that they could escape to Mexico if they ran into trouble.   Eighty years later, scurrilous behaviour is still rife in the City of Angels.